News

Resolving Biological Air Pollutation in Your Home

In order to prevent or remove concentrations of mold, bacteria, and other biological pollutants, you first need to understand how these microorganisms grow. Biological contaminants thrive in moist environments. Bacteria, mold, fungi, and other such nuisances can grow out of control in such conditions. While warmth can also contribute, it is often the colder weather or air conditioning that can worsen the problem because as the air cools, it can hold less moisture, thus causing condensation to develop in potentially hidden areas. Cold windows, for example, can cause a collection of moisture and often grow mold around their perimeter. To...

Locating Biological Pollutants in Your Home

Biological air pollutants include mold, bacteria, fungi, as well as dust mites, insects, and their waste. All of these living (or once living) microorganisms can be harmful when breathed. When present in sufficient amounts, they can cause allergies, asthma, and other health problems. People who live with indoor air pollution of this sort are also more susceptible to viruses, as their immune systems are compromised by the damaging contents of the air. Many of these biological pollutants can lurk in the dark, in secret. People are often not aware that there is a problem until well after the biological contaminants...

Health Effects of Biological Pollutants

Every day in every home and building across the United States, people are exposed to biological pollutants. Even in clean air environments microorganisms are a natural part of life.  And surprisingly, in most buildings there is a higher concentration of air pollution than outside, where pollen and a number of other biological pollutants dwell. Biological pollutants are not always a problem. In fact, a world without germs would be incomprehensible. We carry millions of tiny beneficial flora (microorganisms) inside our intestinal tract. There are tiny microorganisms that live on our skin. Though biological air pollutants are a natural part of...

Types and Sources of Pollutants in the Home

Biological pollutants include microorganisms (alive or dead) and the waste created by living things (hair, dead skin, dried feces/urine, etc.). Biological pollutants are a major source of indoor air pollution, causing health problems that range from mild to severe. Biological air pollutants are able to travel through the air, through ventilation systems that do not utilize high-level filtration, and can even damage surfaces inside and outside the home. There are a number of places that are at high risk for creating or collecting biological pollutants. Bedding can collect shed skin, dust mites (that gravitate to areas of shed skin and...